View from IMF/World Bank 2014

View from IMF World Bank 2014

Date: October 10-12, 2014

Location: Washington DC, US

The Banker is attending the 2014 IMF and World Bank Group Annual Meetings and our editors will be reporting regularly from the event with video interviews with key industry figures.

With articles, reports and videos, The Banker’s View From IMF and World Bank Group Annual Meetings 2014 is your ideal guide to the event.

Register today for free access to three articles every month and ensure you are fully up to date with all the themes discussed at the IMF and World Bank Group Annual Meetings 2014.

IMF 2014: Editorial review

 

 

Philip Alexander, senior editor of The Banker talks to James King, Middle East editor about the topics of discussion at this years IMF in Washington - View from IMF 2014 

Blog from the event

View from IMF

Finance becomes victim instead of cause of risk

The financial sector may be moving down the list of global risks, but this does not come as much of a relief to the banks themselves, writes Philip Alexander from the IMF and World Bank annual meetings in Washington DC.

Featured articles

Argentina on the ropes
From World

On the ropes: can Argentina recover?

A controversial US ruling against Argentina has shaken the world of sovereign debt restructuring and provided so-called vulture funds with a sharp new litigation strategy. As both multilateral organisations and private sector professionals attempt to stop a lawsuit pandemic, The Banker takes an in-depth look at the key issues. 

Axel Kicillof
From World

Axel Kicillof: Argentina wants to pay its bondholders

A ruling in the US judiciary system regarding Argentina’s debt restructuring has caused ructions in international markets. The country’s minister of economy and public finance presents Argentina’s position on this case.

Martin Redrado
From World

Martin Redrado: Argentina must look beyond 2015

The debt crisis is not Argentina’s only problem. The authorities also need to put the county back on a sustainable growth path. 

More articles

The watchdogs of the US financial system

The watchdogs of the US financial system

With a number of eye-watering fines emanating from the US in recent years, The Banker profiles the numerous regulators that are dishing out these punishments, and looks at how they police the world's largest financial market.

What now for investment banks
From World

What now for investment banks?

Investment banks have experienced huge changes since the global financial crisis and are still struggling to adapt their business models. But while the industry might have to make do with much lower returns in future, it is far from being on its knees. 

Credit scoring for the social media generation

Credit scoring for the social media generation

Frustrated with the limitations of traditional credit scoring methods, innovative start-ups are finding new ways to analyse borrower risks using social media and other online data.

Viewpoints

Atiur Rahman

Bangladesh's socially responsible road to economic growth

Socially responsible financing continues to play a key role in Bangladesh's financial sector. Focusing on inclusiveness and green funding has allowed the financial inclusion of the poorer segments of the population, while maintaining the country’s economic stability. 

Ajith Nivard Cabraal

Sri Lanka's call for consolidation

At a time of heightened risk perception in the global financial sector, Sri Lanka is set to consolidate its financial industry to resist volatility and potential shocks, and boost the standard of living throughout the country.

Axel Weber
From Comment

Monetary policy: caught between price stability and financial stability

The interest rate needed for low inflation and full employment is different from the interest rate needed for financial stability. How did this happen and what can be done about it?

Marek Belka (1)
From Comment

National Bank of Poland president eyes Europe cautiously

While much of Europe has struggled over the past few years, the Polish economy has remained resilient, maintaining a sound banking system and hitting its inflation targets. This is why the president of the National Bank of Poland, Marek Belka, is remaining cautious on the topic of eurozone membership, and has no intention of opting into the European banking union.

Andreas Dombret (1)
From Comment

The fundamental rules for new regulation

For new regulation to be effective, it must be adaptable to new innovations, strike the balance between simplicity and complexity, and be coherent across sectors and regions, according to Andreas Dombret of the Deutsche Bundesbank.

Carlo Messina
From Comment

Why Europe needs a Comprehensive Assessment

The European – and indeed global – economy is facing a crucial six months. Central to this is the European Central Bank's Comprehensive Assessment, which will go a long way to boosting confidence within the EU.

Nhlanhla Nene
From Comment

South Africa will benefit from Africa’s rise

South Africa’s growth has been sluggish of late but the country’s financial sector remains one of the world’s most sophisticated, while the government’s reforms are allowing businesses to tap into fast-growing markets in the rest of sub-Saharan Africa more easily.

Ibrahim Abdulaziz Al-Assaf
From Comment

Building on Saudi success

Rather than sit back and enjoy its economic prosperity, Saudi Arabia is working on further strengthening its economic future by investing in education, encouraging the small and medium-sized enterprise sector and promoting private sector employment.

Benno Ndulu
From Comment

Tanzania's mobile-fuelled banking revolution

The development of mobile financial services in Tanzania is bringing the high number of unbanked residents into the financial system. 

Rodger Voorhies
From Comment

Financial access is just the first step toward inclusion

If universal financial inclusion is to really make a difference then it is vitally important that existing financial services are not simply made available but that new products and services are designed with the world's low-income population in mind.

Ziad Fariz
From Comment

Central Bank of Jordan's 10-year plan

Jordan has endured a demanding few years in light of the challenging political and security environment in the Middle East. However, a series of policies introduced by the Central Bank of Jordan and the country's government are already making headway in tackling these challenges.

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