Latest articles from Americas

Banks under legal siege

March 2, 2003

Wall Street banks are facing damages to the tune of $25bn but are reluctant to set aside reserves as they fear it may encourage new claims. Suzanne Miller reports on the legal battle that threatens to spread overseas.

A brand new image

February 2, 2003

Wall Street is finding that there is no quick fix when it comes to winning back public confidence. Suzanne Miller reports from New York on leading banks' attempts at restoring investor faith

Optimistic outlook for Brazil

December 2, 2002

Roberto Setúbal, CEO of Banco Itaú, considers the outlook for Brazil under a newly elected leftist government after a decade of reforms.

President Fox: a man who means business

November 2, 2002

Vicente Fox, Mexico's president, has been determined to combat corruption in government so he can move ahead with economic improvements. Karina Robinson meets him.

Time to go

October 2, 2002

Lessons from Argentina: Sovereign default

February 2, 2002

Argentina's spectacular sovereign debt default may, ironically, change international rules on dealing with such collapses while coming too late for the country itself. Suzanne Miller reports from New York on why the IMF may finally have run out of patience with its old friend.

Tactics must change if the news is good

February 2, 2002

In times of turbulence, investors flocked to Brazilian banks. They always delivered in the worst kind of scenarios. But what if Brazil becomes stable? Brian Caplen analyses how things could change.

Time runs out for the technocrat

May 2, 2001

Karina Robinson interviews Pedro Malan, Brazil's finance minister, who has less than two years left in office before elections.

No more Tequila crises?

July 26, 2000

Guillermo Ortiz looks thoroughly at home in his opulent offices at the Central Bank of Mexico. But, as he points out, in the early 1980s he was already ensconced in the Bank’s economic research bureau.

Accounting for diverse interests

June 2, 2000

As merger and acquisition activity in the US banking sector slows and foreign heavyweights circle, major players are choosing to diversify their portfolio of interests. Michael Blanden reports.

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