Dato’ Nazir Razak

February 2, 2005

CEO, CIMB
Malaysia is in the process of drastically reducing the number of its banks, leaving more people with recent or current CEO experience than there are banks.

Clear sense of direction

February 2, 2005

Pakistan’s banks have been facing up to privatisation and anti-money laundering measures and there are more challenges ahead. Farhan Bokhari reports from Karachi.

Political uncertainty mars bright economy

February 2, 2005

The economy is thriving and banks’ performances reflect this, but president Chen Shui-bian faces political difficulties in promoting the next phase of financial reform, writes Dennis Engbarth in Taipei.

Tsunami fails to dent optimistic outlook

February 2, 2005

Simon Montlake reports from Bangkok on the pre-election mood and discovers that the tsunami disaster has not dented Thai bankers’ confidence.

Finance Minister Asia

January 3, 2005

Jin Renqing, Finance Minister, China

India relaxes private bank investment rules

January 3, 2005

Foreign investors will be allowed to acquire up to 74% of private Indian banks, up from 49%, India’s finance minister, Palaniappan Chidambaram, announced in early December. This clears up doubt over whether foreign investors could participate in the consolidation of the fragmented private banking sector.

Yoshiyuki Fujisawa

January 3, 2005

Since Merrill Lynch acquired Yamaichi Securities in 1998, it has not been an easy passage for the firm’s Japanese business. But, as Yoshiyuki Fujisawa tells Sophie Roell, this year, the tide has turned.
It may have been a long time coming, but Merrill Lynch’s Japanese operations have had a bumper year. The bank chalked up about $130m in profits, making it the most lucrative foreign brokerage in Japan. “We enjoyed a good year last year,” says Yoshiyuki Fujisawa, chairman of Merrill Lynch Japan Securities. “And hopefully, this year will be [good], too.”

Central Banker Asia

January 3, 2005

Ishrat Husain, Governor, State Bank of Pakistan

Small players take initiative in China

December 1, 2004

Insisting on majority control, it took Nestlé most of the 1980s to negotiate its first direct investment in China. At that time, even one of the world’s largest and best capitalised multinationals was nervous about doing such a deal.

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