Latest articles from Africa

Egyptian endeavours

July 2, 2004

A revival in corporate activity and several major project financings give Egypt reasons to be positive, write Jon Marks and Kevin Godier.

From chaos to confidence

July 2, 2004

Finance minster Yaw Osafo-Maafo tells James Eedes how Ghana has managed to shake off financial chaos in the past four years and take the lead in establishing new benchmarks of governance in Africa.

Ready for stage two reforms

July 2, 2004

Mozambique’s prime minister, Luisa Diogo, tells James Eedes about the country’s immense progress in the past decade and its plans for future reforms.

Shortcomings are being identified and addressed

July 2, 2004

Tanzania’s finance minister Basil Mramba talks to Steven Timewell about moves to secure natural resources and update land legislation to free up domestic financing.

Serious about financial reform

June 2, 2004

James Eedes finds that Nigeria’s finance minister is determined to put the country back on track.

Face the challenge

June 2, 2004

Top African bankers have been told they have to reduce costs, satisfy clients and become compliant. Parveen Bansal reports.

Uganda’s plan for a brighter future

May 3, 2004

Despite enviable economic growth stretching back 16 years, Uganda still has many hurdles to overcome, says James Eedes.

Will bitter pill save Zimbabwe?

April 5, 2004

The governor of Zimbabwe’s central bank has had to introduce tough measures – in the face of death threats – to pull the country back from the brink of meltdown. But are they too little, too late? James Eedes reports.

Can Africa convince investors of its value?

April 5, 2004

Sophie Roell considers the prospects for Africa gaining a stronger presence on the world’s stock markets.

Standard Chartered meets Africa’s diversity challenge

April 5, 2004

Douglas Beckett, regional head of consumer banking at Standard Chartered explains the bank’s strategy in Africa, following its recent re-entry into South Africa and Nigeria. By Parveen Bansal.
With its roots in both Asia and Africa, Standard Chartered Bank has emerged in the past 150 years as a leading financial institution in these markets. The present-day bank is the product of a 1969 merger between Standard Bank of South Africa and the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, the latter being the older institution, having been founded in 1835 following the grant of a Royal Charter from Queen Victoria.

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