Latest articles from Americas

Low real interest rates are unsustainable

March 7, 2005

Stephen Roach worries about how the US economy can exit low real interest rates sensitively.

Panama proves its strength

March 7, 2005

This year’s Central American ranking is dominated by Panama’s banks as the country benefits from stability.

Bid for investment grade

February 2, 2005

There are encouraging signs that the turnaround in the Brazilian economy is based on more sturdy underlyings than past upturns, but will it fuel enough growth to achieve an investment grade sovereign rating? Brian Caplen reports.

Laércio Albino Cezar

February 2, 2005

vice-president of technology, Bradesco
In a country whose banking system has become among the most automated in the world, Laércio Albino Cezar – vice-president of technology for Bradesco, Brazil’s number one private bank – has become for many the face of that innovation.

US lines up prospective candidates for next president of World Bank

February 2, 2005

President George W Bush is expected to focus on economic policies during his second term – inaugurated on January 20 – compared with his first administration, in order to achieve his government’s ambitious Social Security and US tax reform plans. To this end, Mr Bush also needs to fill several top-level, economic policymaking positions.

Inauguration day rhetoric is fine but the deficits must be addressed

February 2, 2005

As US president George W Bush starts his second term, will his administration engage with the rest of the world – economically and militarily – or will it be business as usual at the White House?

Alvaro de Molina

February 2, 2005

Cuban immigrant Al de Molina has done an impressive job as treasurer of Bank of America (BofA). “In a difficult interest rate environment, he adroitly managed the ups and downs, with the treasury business ending up being an important contributor to the bottom line,” says Joe Morford, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets.

Argentina faces long and slow haul to recovery

January 3, 2005

Argentina’s recovery from its debt default is likely to be slow and investors’ lack of confidence over contractual law is not helping. Jason Mitchell reports from Buenos Aires.
Argentina will probably reach an accord with its international creditors next year but is likely to suffer the consequences of its debt default for many years as investment flows stall, productivity falls behind competitor countries and interest rates remain high, which will hamper growth.

Finance Minister Americas

January 3, 2005

Francisco Gil Diaz, Finance Secretary, Mexico