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Latest articles from Argentina

Argentina’s record debt swap may not be over yet

April 4, 2005

ARGENTINA could re-open its debt exchange to the 24% of investors who rejected it, once the country’s Congressional elections in October are over.

Argentina faces long and slow haul to recovery

January 3, 2005

Argentina’s recovery from its debt default is likely to be slow and investors’ lack of confidence over contractual law is not helping. Jason Mitchell reports from Buenos Aires.
Argentina will probably reach an accord with its international creditors next year but is likely to suffer the consequences of its debt default for many years as investment flows stall, productivity falls behind competitor countries and interest rates remain high, which will hamper growth.

Bondholders fight back

August 2, 2004

Two and a half years after Argentina’s debt default, creditors are up in arms over the country’s offer to pay back only a quarter of the Ł82bn it owes. But the government has so far refused to budge. Sophie Roell reports.
It’s not a promising sign in any negotiations when one party is not willing to talk to the other and both sides seem as unreasonable as each other. Furious with the paltry amount the Argentine government is offering for the $82bn in debt it defaulted on in December 2001, the Global Committee of Argentina Bondholders (GCAB), grouping together holders of about $37bn in debt, is fighting back with its own idea of a fair settlement.

Investors search for stability overseas

May 3, 2004

Local asset managers in Argentina may be suffering but foreign firms are benefiting. Jason Mitchell reports from Buenos Aires.

When negotiations turn into blackmail

April 5, 2004

Argentina’s negotiating strategy of threatening to default on its loans to get its own way has underlined the case for greater IMF independence.

Driven by confidence and conscience

February 3, 2004

Alfonso Prat-Gay, Argentina’s central bank governor, talks to Karina Robinson about his plans for recapitalising the ailing financial system.
In the run up to my meeting with 38-year-old Alfonso Prat-Gay, governor of the Central Bank of Argentina, I had met 16 top businessmen, bankers and economists who were uniformly charming and informative. So I feared for the famed trait of Argentine arrogance (the classic joke told to me by a host of locals is: How can you make a lot of money? Buy an Argentine for what you know he is worth and sell him for what he thinks he is worth). It was with a sigh of relief, then, that I encountered Mr Prat-Gay, who has that famed trait in spades.

Crumbling away behind a facade of optimism

January 5, 2004

Social unrest and a government that turns a blind eye to problems means Argentina’s future looks bleak, reports Karina Robinson from Buenos Aires.

Lessons from Argentina: Sovereign default

February 2, 2002

Argentina's spectacular sovereign debt default may, ironically, change international rules on dealing with such collapses while coming too late for the country itself. Suzanne Miller reports from New York on why the IMF may finally have run out of patience with its old friend.

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