Latest articles from Middle East

Doha courts expats with step into CRM

February 3, 2004

With more than three-quarters of Qatar’s population come from overseas, Doha Bank is focusing on expatriate customers, says Parveen Bansal.
With energy needs expanding worldwide and oil prices remaining high, the Qatari economy is booming. Under the prudent leadership of His Highness Sheikh Hamad Ben Khalifa Al Thani, the state’s development strategy is focusing on diversification of the economy away from oil, toward extensive gas reserves and industrial expansion. Oil and natural gas revenues enable Qatar to have a per capita income not far below the leading industrial countries in western Europe.

Jordan makes best of it despite regional turmoil

January 5, 2004

Surrounding countries may be in turmoil but Jordan’s banks are laying expansion plans that include Iraq, as Rupert Wright reports from Amman.

Iran pushes for privatisation

December 2, 2003

Iran is set on a privatisation course to revive the economy and improve efficiency in its financial institutions. By Stephen Timewell and Mohsen Asgari in Tehran.

Tough line on reform pays off

December 2, 2003

In a region of political upheaval, Iran has worked hard to maintain its
stability. Strong oil revenues and healthy trade with the EU have
supported expansion and the outlook is positive.

Change is coming

December 2, 2003

Stephen Timewell reports on the slow but sure growth of Iran’s private banks.

Open to capital

December 2, 2003

Legal reforms have opened the doors of the Tehran Stock Exchange to foreign investors, reports Mohsen Asgari.

One-way traffic

December 2, 2003

While Iranian banks are deregulating and expanding abroad, foreign players are still constrained by regulation, as Stephen Timewell reports from Tehran.

Gulf gets a retail boost

November 3, 2003

While Gulf banks enjoy strong results, banks in non-oil countries have seen a drop in their profits. Stephen Timewell reports.

Bulls in a tight economy

November 3, 2003

It is a wonder that Zambia’s banks survive, let alone make money, in a country where running costs are high, reports Gill Baker.