Latest articles from Comment

Taking care of business ethically must be priority for new year

January 5, 2004

Banks have only themselves to blame for the burgeoning weight of regulation. It’s time to do some corporate spring cleaning.

Regime change in commodity markets

January 5, 2004

Michael Lewis assesses the chances of continued strong commodity prices and links with the dollar.

Past lessons learnt, hope for the future

January 5, 2004

Henrique de Campos Meirelles assesses the achievements of the Lula administration in leading Brazil out of crisis.
Brazil is living through a time of hope, in which it is re-discussing its past and its present in order to create a new future. Today, it is clear that this new future may be quite different and much better than the one envisaged at the beginning of 2003.

China expands foreign access to local markets

January 5, 2004

China’s top banking regulator played Santa Claus to foreign banks weeks before Christmas last year, announcing measures that gave them greater access to the local market.

Stronger companies give Spain hope of busy 2004

January 5, 2004

Investment bankers in Spain are looking forward to an active 2004 as Spanish companies lift their heads above the parapet with repaired balance sheets and more positive stockmarket sentiment. This follows two years, 2001 and 2002, which Antonio Rodriguez-Pina, president of Credit Suisse First Boston (Espana) calls “the worst and most difficult of the last 20 years”.

GE financial services rules of engagement

January 5, 2004

In 1987 ge had 7,500 employees in Europe. It now has 75,000, split between financial and industrial services. Andrew Moore from GE Consumer Finance (a division with $77bn of total assets) and Ivan Royle, director of communications for financial services at GE Capital Europe, gave The Banker a few tips from this serial acquirer:

The costs of Basel II implementation

January 5, 2004

Dear Editor
I have been following the debate about Basel II in The Banker with interest. To use an insurance analogy, moving from a flat-rate method of assessing motor premiums to one in which premiums depend on the driver’s accident history inevitably provokes opposition from learner drivers and those with poor accident records. But safe drivers are not treated fairly by a flat rate approach. The Basel Committee has been exceptionally transparent in the development of its proposals and this has manifested itself in the controversy reflected in your columns.

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