Latest articles from Western Europe

The show goes on

April 5, 2004

The Madrid bomb blast may have changed the election outcome but Spain’s strong economic performance is unlikely to be affected. Jules Stewart reports.

Back on track

April 5, 2004

Spanish banks have had an uphill struggle in Latin America but now the continent is delivering returns at the same time as the domestic market remains buoyant. Jules Stewart reports.
Last month’s terrorist attacks in Madrid may have raised a question mark over Spain’s political agenda, but for the banks it is business as usual, only more so. The outlook for 2004 is for continued growth inoperating profits.

Economic orthodoxy

April 5, 2004

Spain’s public debt market has been strengthened by sound fiscal management, above-average economic growth and improved liquidity.

Top players seek fan base in Europe

March 3, 2004

The big, profit-hungry banks that have emerged from consolidation in Iceland are now hoping to gain a following abroad, reports Michael Imeson.

Istanbul takes centre stage

March 3, 2004

Turkey’s finance minister Kemal Unakitan talks to Stephen Timewell about involvement in a new development bank and the country’s privatisation strategy.

Clean-up boosts investors’ trust

February 3, 2004

Erol Sabanci, chairman of Akbank, tells Stephen Timewell of his optimism on recent sector reforms and the political and economic outlook for Turkey.

Cross-border pioneer fights on

February 3, 2004

Dexia is the result of a pioneering cross-border merger in Europe. Its experiences demonstrate the difficulties of executing an international strategy across a region within which regulations differ, writes Brian Caplen.

Stronger companies give Spain hope of busy 2004

January 5, 2004

Investment bankers in Spain are looking forward to an active 2004 as Spanish companies lift their heads above the parapet with repaired balance sheets and more positive stockmarket sentiment. This follows two years, 2001 and 2002, which Antonio Rodriguez-Pina, president of Credit Suisse First Boston (Espana) calls “the worst and most difficult of the last 20 years”.

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